Samsung Galaxy S8 phone is easily fragile: repair shops are looking forward

Samsung Galaxy S8 is easily fragile: repair shops are looking forward

Not only friends of elegant smartphones are looking forward to the futuristic Galaxy S8 phone, also operators of repair shops are rubbing their hands in the face of the fragile design. “It will definitely break, there is no doubt,” the industry says.

The Galaxy S8 phone unites everything that makes repair shops happy: it is popular, expensive and fragile. How fragile, the Foundation Warentest recently presented. In her test of the Galaxy S8 was the talk of “blame in the dropping test”. Due to the design of the device, where the glass back and front seamlessly passes into the frame, slight impacts or falls from low height are already sufficient to leave a crack or worse – and at the prices.

The same is also reported by some repair shops, according to which the first day after the market launch of the Galaxy S8 phone the first inquiries regarding display glass exchange reinsmen. The repair shops also benefit from the fact that the spare parts are comparatively cheap, which is why the margin is more attractive on the one hand, and customers can be broken at lower prices on the other hand. The Galaxy S7 cost a spare screen about 300 US dollars, the Galaxy S8 is just under 200 US dollars – so repair shops can even under power many smartphone insurances.

Samsung Galaxy S8 phone: Repair is worth it anyway

Samsung Galaxy S8 is easily fragile: repair shops are looking forward

A new Galaxy S8 currently costs around 800 euros; A repair is therefore in any case more favorable than a new purchase. The lower repair price does not excuse the fragile construction, balanced with the resulting optics of the Galaxy S8 phone, Samsung has, however, the bottom line probably not so much wrong. The good sales figures speak for this. In addition, most users access protective wraps or films.

Source: Motherboard

Samsung Galaxy S8 phone is easily fragile: repair shops are looking forward was last modified: May 12th, 2017 by Boby Sanburn