Amazon Underground: Free App program set after two years

Amazon Underground: Free App program set after two years

About two years ago, Amazon Underground launched as a permanent offer, which actually paid apps for free. The developers were rewarded by the retailer for the duration of the application instead of through the acquisition. This obviously does not pay off, because the service will be discontinued next month.

The premise sounds interesting: the purchase price of an app is omitted, but Amazon pays the developers directly for the use. Per minute it was 0.2 cent (US dollar). Thus, if a user spends an hour within the app, the developer receives 12 cents. The bottom line was that developers were encouraged to launch popular – ergo: mainstream – enabled apps to benefit from the underground. The users of the Amazon ecosystem again had the advantage of having to pay effectively no cent for a high-quality app.

Amazon Underground: Stock apps still available until 2019

Amazon Underground: Free App program set after two years

The system should probably be refined through advertising and increasing circulation; Amazon had and finally made ground on the Play Store. However, since the launch in August 2015, the plan appears to have been limited. In a message, Amazon now announces that from next May, no new submissions from developers for the Underground to take more.

Already existing apps are still supported until 2019, until then, developers are still paid out. As a result, successful applications of the program will continue to be updated regularly until further notice. Access to Amazon Underground is only possible until summer 2017, after which only users who have previously entered can access the free apps.

It seems as if Amazon also indirectly dominated the preeminence of the Play Store as a starting point for Android apps, although the own App-Store is maintained and is to be further developed according to the communication.

Source: Amazon

Amazon Underground: Free App program set after two years was last modified: April 30th, 2017 by Boby Sanburn